ORB – Oregonian Research Blog

July 21, 2008

Web 2.0 is all about you, but is that TMI?

Future doctors sharing too much?
A University of Florida study published this month in the Journal of General Internal Medicine found that many medical students act more like students then future doctors.

GAINESVILLE, Fla. — Would it bother you to know that your physician smokes cigars and likes to do “keg stands”? That your gynecologist was a member of a group called “I Hate Medical School”? That your urologist is a fan of “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre”?

That is exactly the sort of information many people share on social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace. According to a new University of Florida study, many medical students are sharing far too much.

“College has traditionally been a time in life when non-normative behaviors are considered OK,” said Dr. Lindsay Acheson Thompson, an assistant professor of general pediatrics at UF’s College of Medicine. “I’m not sure I would want to have a permanent, public record of everything I did 10 years ago, but many of our students are creating just such a record, and they need to understand the problems this may cause.”
Read more on the University of Florida News site.


Gawker thinks newspapers should ban comments.

Let’s begin with some truisms: a newspaper is not a blog—not even its online version. Conversely, a blog is not a newspaper. However, newspapers have been in the toilet lately, partly due to the proliferation of blogs. One easy pseudo-solution some newspapers have settled on is to act more and more like blogs. After all, this 2.0 world is all about “You,” the user, which in practice means it’s all about a false sense of democracy through publication of comments and user-generated content—just like a common blog. After the jump: why newspapers should stop slumming as blogs and disallow comments. Full post.

Mark Friesen points out that the stock photo they use is of a copy of the Newport News-Times. Looks like it is a 2004 edition.

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